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I believe its a highly conductive fluid, wich can easily, trough fluid convection currents, "transfer" the heat away from its source, bringing in the coolest part of it down (the one who was cooled in the heatsinks w/ fan)

 

Quote from wikipedia:

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A heat pipe is a heat transfer mechanism that can transport large quantities of heat with a very small difference in temperature between the hotter and colder interfaces.

 

Inside a heat pipe, at the hot interface a fluid turns to vapour and the gas naturally flows and condenses on the cold interface. The liquid falls or is moved by capillary action back to the hot interface to evaporate again and repeat the cycle.

 

 

A typical heat pipe consists of a sealed pipe or tube made of a material with high thermal conductivity such as copper or aluminium. A vacuum pump is used to exclude all fluids (both gases and liquids) from the empty heat pipe, and then the pipe is filled with a fraction of a percent by volume of working fluid, (or coolant), chosen to match the operating temperature. Some example fluids are water, ethanol, acetone, sodium, or mercury. Due to the partial vacuum that is near or below the vapor pressure of the fluid, some of the fluid will be in the liquid phase and some will be in the gas phase.

 

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So as I said, the hotter part goes up, cooler part goes down, really fast.

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Hi comunity I was thinking in if there is something inside the heatpipes of the coolers market, something like a gas (freon or other) or liquid or just air.

The same doubt with the heatpipes of motherboards.

 

 

What's inside?

 

thanks in advance.

For your typical computer heat pipes (CPU, GPU cooling) distilled water is used. A few use Methanol, but mostly water.

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